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Why The Bitcoin Miners Are Destined To Lose The Forking Wars

· March 24, 2017 · 6:00 pm

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Excuse me for indulging myself, but there are many points of view towards what may be an impending hard fork for Bitcoin. This may come across as a loosely coherent ramble, but at least it is short and sweet. There is enough here to put it on wax, so here’s what I see, in the big picture.


This is in response to the Medium post created by Peter Rizun yesterday, outlining how this hard fork may play out, and essentially showing a way BTU wins, in the long run. (Roger Ver tweeted his support for this post, so I read it and posted most of these thoughts in the comments section, and here we are.)

In my humble opinion, the problem I see coming is if BCU breaks off, it will become an altcoin, as has been established by the Bitcoin exchange establishment. These miners can mine all the blocks they want, if the greater community doesn’t trust their developers, doesn’t want an altcoin, and isn’t buying BCU, it is irrelevant by design.

The market will decide who wins, and anybody who is not a miner wants to stick with Core and their chain. The miners are one thing, the market is something else. The miners might win a battle, but they would lose that war. They should keep that in mind.

Without those miners, BTC would definitely take a hit, but the Core developers could then quickly move to a 2MB upgrade and get SegWit and The Lightning Network approved, creating greater Bitcoin functionality, from a trusted group of developers, and an incredible upside in off-chain scalability that an on-chain approach would be hard pressed to match. All without the centralization and control of the miners.

segwit-logo

Users will follow anyone who is going to implement SegWit. The market is sold on this concept as a boon to Bitcoin functionality. BTU has not done a very good sales job at all regarding their position. Scaling away from miners will hurt mining, but it will let Bitcoin reach its full potential.

BTU needs to sell their mined Bitcoins to a market. I’m not seeing much of a market for BTU, outside of the miners and BTU investors, themselves. The miners do not control Bitcoin, and even Core does not control Bitcoin. Maybe, just maybe, The People control Bitcoin’s future growth? Anyone who thinks the market doesn’t have a handle on who each side is looking out for here is fooling themselves.

Just seeing how the community is responding, keeping my ear to the ground, the greater community will not follow the miners, who are primarily looking to turn a digital buck in Bitcoin. They will follow Core, who is looking after the greater good. Miners will lose that tug of war.

Bitcoin miners vs Bitcoin core

It has become clear that BTU developers cannot replace BTC developers, as the recent bugs have shown the world, but BTC miners can be replaced. There are plenty of people around the world who want that job and can do it just as well.

This power struggle is really temporary in nature. People will not follow miners looking for profit first, and who want to hijack the entire system, from now on, in order to get it. That is not leadership.

At the end of the day, The People will decide to back Core. The only question is when will the dissenting miners, clouded by visions of endless Bitcoin profiteering, figure this fact out?

If the miners didn’t get the memo, that the vast majority of the market will stick with Core and not dump BTC for any BTU altcoin, use this. Like Bitcoin itself, it’s far from perfect, but it’ll do just fine.

How do you think a hard fork would play out? Should there be an increase in block size? Let us know what you think below!


Images courtesy of Bitcoin Core, AdobeStock

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Kvě 26

Bitcoin Rises, But What Will Happen in July at the Halving?

Source: bitcoin

Bitcoin halving

Bitcoin is back up! Since our last price piece and Ether’s rise to the top with arguably the largest crowdsale in history, bitcoin has grown by about $9 in price and is getting people excited once again.

Also read: Ether to Blame for Bitcoin’s Decline?

As with all ascensions, bitcoin enthusiasts are coming out of the dark with smiles on their faces and happily telling skeptics, “We told you so.” For a while, it appeared as if Ethereum was going hog the spotlight. A crowdfunding campaign that manages to raise nearly $200 million is certainly something worth noting, but in the end, bitcoin couldn’t be kept down.

How Will Bitcoin Fare Heading Into the Halving?

But how long will it last? As one source states, bitcoin production is scheduled to be cut in half starting in July. Naturally, this is bound to affect the price, but in what way, and by how much?

Some say the sky’s the limit. According to Gil Luria, a Webbush Securities analyst who covers the Bitcoin investment vehicle GBTC:

“There’s always a lot of factors in the price of Bitcoin, but all those things being equal, [the halving] should help the price go up, if for no other reason than of the rule of economics… It’s a function of the intersection of supply and demand, and the halving literally means there will be less [new] supply every day.”

In other words, this could be just the thing bitcoin needs to stay on top for good. After all, a scarce item is likely to hold more value than one that is plentiful or common.

But others aren’t entirely convinced. In fact, one of the big problems expected from the halving is the fact that miners will possibly have to deal with potential drops in profitability.

Miners are responsible for keeping transactions going on the blockchain. Often, these miners receive incentives based on the number of transactions they oversee. With fewer transactions set to take place, you can bet some of those incentives will disappear, which could ultimately lead to a disgruntled work environment among present members of the digital mining sector. Unless the bitcoin price doubles in a short time, bitcoin miners could see quick and massive drops in revenue.

Furthermore, if miners become fed up with the lack of financial security and exit the mining arena permanently, we’re likely to see blockchain security compromised over time. The primary fear is that transaction limits will be hit, leading to lost faith and ultimately, the coin’s final days.

While thoughts are running wild, one thing can be labeled as marginally true, at least for the time being: we don’t know what’s going to happen. Whether bitcoin doubles in price or doesn’t go anywhere at all, there’s no way to predict where digital finance will go. The halving is on its way, and there’s not much we can do to stop it. What we can do, however, is accept the changes that are likely to occur starting mid-July, and do our best to adapt and keep our favorite digital coin (and ourselves) afloat.

What do you foresee happening when the halving takes place? Post your comments below!


Images courtesy of insidebitcoins.com, jefflau.net.

The post Bitcoin Rises, But What Will Happen in July at the Halving? appeared first on Bitcoinist.net.

Bitcoin Rises, But What Will Happen in July at the Halving?

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