Srp 12

Nvidia to Focus More on Cryptocurrency Mining Market

· August 12, 2017 · 2:15 pm

In the wake of record-setting growth for digital currencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum, graphics card manufacturer Nvidia has expressed their intent to focus more on the cryptocurrency mining market.


Cryptocurrency Mining Boom

Since the beginning of 2017, the cryptocurrency market has grown at an enormous rate. In late 2016 the total market capitalization of the cryptocurrency market was a respectable $14 billion and in the months since has climbed a record-setting $135 billion as of this writing!

Bitcoin and Ethereum prices spiked to their ATH (all time high) and mining became profitable for individuals and miners rushed to purchase as many graphic cards as possible in order to profit from the surging prices of both Bitcoin and Ethereum.

The mining rush was so severe, that it even caused a national shortage of graphics cards in Russia. The graphics cards shortages made manufacturers like Nvidia and AMD realize that there is another profitable market for graphics cards, and that’s the cryptocurrency mining market.

Focusing on the Cryptocurrency Market

Nvidia graphics cards

According to a recent article in MarketWatch, Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang stated that the cryptocurrency mining market could potentially become another profitable area for Nvidia. In a recent phone call with analysts, Mr. Huang stated:

Crypto is here to stay, and the market will grow to be quite large.

He also went on to say:

It’s not likely to go away any time soon. There will be more currencies to come, they will come from different nations…We stay very close to the market, and understand the dynamics very well.

The most interesting aspect of the whole cryptocurrency mining rush is the potential development of GPUs for mining. While Nvidia officials have declined to comment on rumors that the famous graphics cards manufacturer is developing GPUs that are specifically made for cryptocurrency mining, Huang recently hinted to analysts that the company offers coin miners “a special coin-mining SKU [that is] optimized for mining.”

It’s also worth noting that thanks to the recent mining rush AMD shares have soared from the increase of graphics cards sales as well.

What are your thoughts on Nvidia’s stance on cryptocurrency mining? Do you think that AMD and Nvidia will focus more on cryptocurrency mining products? Let us know in the comments below!


Images courtesy of Pixabay, Nvidia

Show comments

Share
Čvn 12

5 Companies Set to Profit From The Cryptocurrency Gold Rush

· June 12, 2017 · 12:00 pm

Nvidia, AMD, Intel and Micron as makers of hardware mining tools, such as GPUs and ASIC-based mining solutions, are tapped to profit the most from the new internet gold rush.


Heigh-Ho, Heigh-Ho, It’s Off To Work We Go

As the price of Bitcoin rises it has the knock-on effect of causing a rise in the rest of the cryptocurrency market with most other altcoins also seeing sizeable gains in value. These coins can be “mined” with a graphics card and are usually exchanged for Bitcoin, turning a good profit for miners.

Heigh Ho Heigh Ho Its Off to Work We Go

Specialty online mining pools such as multipool.us pool together the hashing power of individual miners and automatically choose the most profitable altcoin to mine, switching to other coins as the price dictates. In the past, electricity costs could negate actual profit from GPU mining, but with the overall rise in value of the cryptocurrency market as a whole, the situation has once again changed.

In a Gold Rush Sell Shovels

AMD has been in the news recently because their high-end gaming cards are sold out due to their mining ability. The company has seen big stock gains this year, rising in tandem with Bitcoin as their graphics cards are the most efficient when it comes to mining protocols. This has caused anger and controversy among gamers, AMD GPUs’ key market. The unavailability of the best cards has driven up prices, sending potential customers to their rivals, Nvidia, who have also been seeing gains this year.

GPU manufacturers aren’t the only ones benefiting from the current boom either. ASIC manufacturers such as Bitmain, who sell Antminers, have been seeing increased attention. ASICs are specialist circuits optimized for performing a single function, in this case, mining Bitcoin.

Other beneficiaries include memory chip manufacturer Micron Technology Inc., whose share prices have increased by nearly 50% this year. Intel is jumping on the bandwagon as well, maneuvering to compete with AMD with their own currently integrated graphics solutions.

Have you started up your mining rigs again? Are there other companies set to profit from the new gold rush? Let us know in the comments below.


Images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, Google Finance, AdobeStock

Show comments

Share
Čvc 30

Radeon Overview: Aftermarket Polaris Cards Shaking up GPU Mining?

Source: bitcoin

Polaris

The Radeon RX 480 was released onto the GPU market without much fanfare, sold as a mid-range card at a low price – which is exactly how it performs. Despite the excitement in the gaming press about AMD’s Polaris architecture and the RX (and upcoming Pro WX) line of GPUs, particularly about the card’s price point, it seems to have been glossed over by the crypto mining community. 

Also read: The Bitcoinist Podcast is Back

The 480 boasts 26-27 MH/s when put to the task of ETH mining, around 85 percent of what its older brother, the 390X, can put out at around half of the launch price. Despite the card’s promise as an efficient and inexpensive piece of mining hardware, the first batch of reference models had power delivery issues, mediocre cooling, and a lack of raw performance that raised concerns for those looking to put them to work in 24/7 mining operations.

Impressive Hashpower at a Good Price

Miners on the fence about Polaris will be happy to know that the AIB partner cards, as well as the cut-down RX 470 and 460, are coming to market in the next few days. These cards come with superior cooling and beefed up power delivery that makes them more desirable for mining and other intensive uses.

With a lot of the initial red flags thrown up around this GPU about to become non-issues, we’ve decided to revisit the Polaris architecture and explore just how efficient and powerful the RX 480 is when it comes to GPU mining.

We’ll be comparing cards utilizing the RX 200, 300 and 400 series GPUs to analyze how each generation of GCN stacks up against the next when it comes to mining Ethereum. I’ve left nVidia’s Pascal and Maxwell cards out of the benchmarks because, despite their improved hashing performance, comparisons across the manufacturers, and from OpenCL to Cuda optimized mining, is beyond the scope of this article.

When looking at AMD GPU mining performance, it helps to understand the incongruity between their GPU architectures and their branding. Cards in the previous generation’s 300 series are primarily refreshes of older chips, with higher clocks and more/better memory. The 390X, a mining favorite, for example, is essentially a memory extended, overclocked 290X. The 380 is a souped-up 285 (which is the newest design from them outside of the Fury series’ Fiji Chip and the newer Polaris architecture), and the 370 is working with the same chips put into the now four-year-old HD 7000 series cards.

Because each price range of card uses a different architecture, with various design time frames and iterations, you’ll see dramatic jumps between each step in their lineup, and only marginal gains from generation to generation. The newest RX 400 series is unique in that it is the first non-iterative jump in design in nearly five years for AMD, and, as you’ll soon see, it certainly shows:

Polaris: New Efficiency King

AMD’s Polaris 2.0 architecture shows an appreciable 28 percent raw performance improvement over the last gen 380, and an even more dramatic 51 percent improvement over the previous iteration’s 285.

Of course, it’s not as simple as looking at raw hash power when evaluating mining equipment. Otherwise, the RX 480 would take a lackluster backseat to the current king in GPU mining, the 390X. What’s remarkable about the 480 is that it achieves this high level of compute performance while drawing less than half of what the 390X does at the outlet. With the latest drivers, the card only draws 159 Watts under full load, and under-volting the card further can increase its performance by stabilizing its maximum “boost” frequency. That’s right, the 480 holds the unique position of performing better with less power than the default settings.

So what does this drastic reduction in power draw mean? Well, the RX 480 blows every other card in the lineup out of the water regarding efficiency. It only draws 6 watts, compared to the 390X’s 11.5 or the 285’s godawful 12.3 watts, per mega-hash, per second. The 400 series’ Polaris GPUs are as much as 104.38 percent, or 85.16 percent on average, more efficient hash-for-hash than the GCN 1.X cards of the 300 and 200 series:

At the average cost of power in the US, around 10 cents per kilowatt-hour as of May 2016, you could expect to pay $440 in electricity per month for a 1 GH/s mining rig using 480s, where a similar setup using 390Xs would cost around $842 per month (this figure excludes the power draw of the other components in the system, but all things equal that’s still a $400 a month difference per GHash).

With aftermarket RX 480s hitting the shelves right about now, the Polaris line of GPUs has become an incredibly attractive piece of mining hardware. It’ll be interesting to see the effects Polaris will have on large-scale operations, as well as what the 470 and 460 will bring in terms of Hashpower per watt.

Questions or comments on the performance of Polaris or Pascal GPUs? Leave them in the comments!


Detailed power draw data courtesy of Tom’s Hardware.

The post Radeon Overview: Aftermarket Polaris Cards Shaking up GPU Mining? appeared first on Bitcoinist.net.

Radeon Overview: Aftermarket Polaris Cards Shaking up GPU Mining?

Share