Lis 20

Bitcoin Public Full Node Count Surpasses 10,000

New data released by Coin Dance this week shows that the number of bitcoin public nodes made a significant jump. The reported 10,094 public nodes places the total number back over 10,000 for the first time since March.


Hard Core

Around 95 percent of the nodes are running Bitcoin Core, a proportion which has remained steady since early 2018. The Bitcore software follows not-so-closely behind, commanding just 2 percent of the nodes — 198 to Core’s 9648.

global currency

Then there are 56 nodes still running Bitcoin UASF, which was developed to counter miners’ reluctance to adopt SegWit back in August 2017. As Bitcoinist reported last month, many in the industry consider that movement as an emphatic victory for users over corporate interests.

After peaking at 1.35k nodes at the time of the proposed fork, UASF nodes quickly dropped off after the success of their mission. The past year has seen numbers falling more steadily to their current level. The movement and consequent hard fork of BTC 00 and BCH, did however spur an impressive increase in node uptake.

Most software iterations are currently losing nodes to Bitcoin Core. One exception to this trend is Bitcoin Knots, which has seen 10 new nodes in the last week.

Lightning Bolt

Meanwhile Lightning Network continues to go from strength to strength, racking up 4000 nodes earlier this month. This caused the main net capacity to reach an all-time high of 118 BTC.

Why Node?

Any user can set up a bitcoin full node, and there are several reasons why you might want to. Apart from the warm and fuzzy feeling you’ll get from knowing you are helping the bitcoin network, that is.

Running a node gives users increased security and privacy, as there is no need to rely on third party service providers. It also gives users a choice in how the network develops, through the software implementation you decide to run. And it isn’t as difficult or expensive as you may think.

What are your thoughts on the jump in Bitcoin nodes? Let us know in the comments below!


Images courtesy of Shutterstock.

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Zář 20

There’s a ‘Concerted Effort to Suppress Litecoin Price,’ Says Charlie Lee

Litecoin creator, Charlie Lee, took to Twitter, complaining about recent efforts to “suppress Litecoin price” with FUD spreading by those “shorting LTC and… that see Litecoin as a threat.”


Big Up Da Litecoin

Lee had a lot to say regarding accusations that Litecoin 00 had lost its edge in an increasingly oversaturated market.

Illustrating the high level of security in the network, he highlighted the miners’ lack of incentive to attack it, as this would devalue $150 million of hardware investment. He also mentioned Litecoin’s domination of Scrypt mining.

Regarding liquidity, Lee pointed out that Litecoin trades on virtually every exchange. Nine major payment processors support it, and the network processes $200 million of transactions every day.

Charlie Lee: LN Doesn’t Make Litecoin Obsolete

Rather than making LTC redundant technology, Lightning Network actually plays nice together with both Bitcoin and Litecoin, according to Lee. Many LN clients/apps support Litecoin, allowing atomic swaps, and even submarine swaps, using LTC to pay lightning BTC invoices. He adds:

Litecoin will always be the cheapest and fastest on ramp to Lightning Network.

Even if Litecoin’s only value were as a bitcoin test-net, Lee argues that its value is greater than the 3 percent of bitcoin’s market cap it currently represents.

Litecoin’s practical proof of SegWit utility enabled its adoption and activation on the Bitcoin network. This kind of testing is not possible on the real Bitcoin testnet, as valueless coins create no incentive for malicious actors to hack it.

Litecoin (LTC)

Charlie DOES Care and Litecoin IS Still Being Developed

Lee caused a scandal last year when, faced with accusations that he was acting for ‘personal benefit,’ he sold and donated all his LTC holdings. He has since stated that he will never buy back in, backing up his claims of “conflict of interest.” However, he also recently appeared to favor Bitcoin over Litecoin as an initial crypto investment.

Despite this, his tweets confirm that he is still working on Litecoin full-time and promoting Litecoin adoption. Countering suggestions that Litecoin has had no development in the past 6 months, he highlights two updates in the past 2 weeks. He also points out that it is good practice not to do development work “on the master branch, where people are looking.”

As would be expected, responses to the tweets vary from the “Litecoin rulez! Charlie is my hero!” school of thought to “Well why did you sell yours then?”

You can please some of the people, some of the time, eh?

Are there concerted actions being taken to suppress Litecoin price? Share your thoughts below!


Images courtesy of Twitter, Shutterstock

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Srp 15

New Transport Layer bloXroute Promises to Solve Bitcoin’s Biggest Problem

bloXroute Labs and a team of Northwestern University students believe Bitcoin’s biggest problem, scalability, can be solved without affecting its chief virtue — decentralization.

Northwestern and bloXroute Labs Are Working to Solve Scalability Issue

Critics have always identified the limited number of transactions that Bitcoin’s 00 network can process as its most significant problem. They point out that this is what has prevented Bitcoin from becoming the most effective form of payment in the world.

Several techniques have been and are currently being implemented to address the issue of scalability and high transaction fees. Nevertheless, they are not good enough to compete today with Visa, for example.

bloXroute Labs identifies the problem that affects Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies’ networks, as follows:

Specifically, they employ a trustless P2P network model to propagate transactions and blocks, which does not scale as the volume of transactions increases, a fact research has shown time and again. Indeed, if blocks and transactions were to be instantly propagated, immense blocks could have been mined at a rapid pace, until the limitation of designated processing units and flash storage arrays was reached.

Now, a team comprised of bloXroute Labs engineers and students and academics of Northwestern University believe they have found a trustless scheme to overcome this scalability bottleneck.Now, a team comprised of bloXroute Labs engineers and students and academics of Northwestern University believe they have found a trustless scheme to overcome this scalability bottleneck. According to Watch Market:

The Northwestern University proposal attempts to address some of those issues by creating an infrastructure that compresses the information on the blockchain before sending, with the propagation being it will go faster.

In this regard, bloXroute Labs proposes bloXroute, a transport layer that would run underneath, allowing Bitcoin and all cryptocurrencies to scale to thousands of chain transactions per second.

According to the whitepaper entitled bloXroute: A Scalable Trustless Blockchain Distribution Network,”

“bloXroute allows to safely increase the block size and to cut down the time interval between blocks, without increasing the risk of forks, and provides real-time support for immediate transactions with zero-confirmation (0-conf).”

The whitepaper stresses that by using bloXroute, the network becomes even more decentralized because it requires neither consensus nor a protocol change beyond adjusting system parameters.

Technological Advances Are Fueling Bitcoin Optimism

Novel technological initiatives that include SegWit, Lightning Network, and Atomic Multi-Path Payments over Lightning, and new features in Bitcoin Core 0.16.0, are also promising to help to address Bitcoin’s scalability issue.

For example, Lightning Network is growing and enabling faster transactions among nodes. As of this writing, Lightning Network boasts over 3,000 nodes, with a capacity of about 82 bitcoins.

The Northwestern University team started working in this project in March 2018, and claims to be moving forward to solving the scaling issue. According to Sarit Markovich, professor of strategy at Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University,

“We are scaling at 100 times better than what Bitcoin 00 is doing now. And we are hoping for 1,000.”

Do you think the newest technological innovations are helping to solve cryptocurrencies’ scalability issues? Let us know in the comments below!

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Images courtesy of Pixabay, Wikimedia/by Rdsmith4

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Úno 27

Crashes And Failed Payments: Peter Todd Urges Caution Over Lightning Network

· February 27, 2018 · 11:30 am

Bitcoin Core developer Peter Todd has delivered a frank appraisal of the Lightning Network, suggesting it is technically insufficient in its current form.


Lightning’s Growing Pains

Writing about his “initial impressions” of Lightning’s testnet implementation on Twitter Monday, Todd questioned aspects including operational resilience and programming language.

“Initial impressions of Lightning on testnet: c-lightning segfaults a lot, and when it’s not crashing payments fail more often than not. Writing it in C – a notoriously dangerous language – doesn’t strike me as a good idea,” he wrote.

Since its mainnet debut at the start of the year, the Lightning Network has grown rapidly, but cryptocurrency experts and developers remain divided over whether the technology is ready for use at all.

Future Vulnerability Today

The most hotly awaited of the so-called ‘Layer 2’ Bitcoin network improvements, Lightning promises near-zero transaction fees and confirmation times.

This month, Microsoft threw its weight behind the project, pledging support for it as an off-chain Bitcoin scaling solution while pouring cold water over on-chain solutions such as block size increases.

On a technical level, however, the experimental state of Lightning remains evident. Figures including Bitcoin.org creator Cobra preceded Todd in voicing doubts about a consumer rollout given the untested nature of many of its features. The result, both say, could be lost funds.

“As for the Lightning protocol, I’m willing to predict it’ll prove to be vulnerable to DoS attacks in it’s (sic) current incarnation, both at the P2P and blockchain level,” Todd meanwhile predicted.

“While bad politics, focusing on centralized hub-and-spoke payment channels first would have been much simpler.”

Lightning has also faced caution from Andreas Antonopoulos, who despite championing its technological promise saw regulatory woes forcing major cryptocurrency exchanges to avoid offering it.

This week meanwhile also saw Bitcoin Core release version 0.16.0, a major milestone incorporating full support for SegWit scaling improvements, itself a useful foundation for allowing Layer 2 solutions to spread.

What do you think about Peter Todd’s angle on the Lightning Network? Let us know in the comments below!


Images courtesy of Shutterstock, Twitter

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Led 10

Bitcoin Fees Near-Zero as Company Launches Mainnet Lightning Payments

· January 10, 2018 · 6:00 am

Anonymous VPN service TorGuard has become one of the first consumer businesses to accept Lightning Network (LN) payments for Bitcoin.


‘Testnet Is So Boring’

In messages on Twitter staff since appeared to back up privately, TorGuard confirmed users can now pay for its services in Bitcoin using Lightning, significantly reducing transaction times and fees.

The news makes the company a pioneer of Bitcoin mainnet LN payments after the technology debuted as a testnet interface last month.

“Disclaimer: c-lightning is not production ready. TorGuard will cover loss of funds when sending us LN payments. Testnet is so boring,” tweets added.

One Transaction = One Satoshi?

Excited community members reacted broadly positively to a customer service representative similarly offering LN payments, seemingly unaware TorGuard had already publicly announced the new feature.

“Do you have (an) LN (mainnet) node up and running? If so, I can invoice you for 1 month of our service for only 1 satoshi,” the representative offered.

This last point appeared to cause contention, responses arguing the actual cost of a Lightning transaction would be significantly higher than the $0.‎00014167 quoted due to the need to open and close a channel before and after.

Bitcoin advocates have long championed Lightning as the crucial solution to the ongoing high transaction fees and slow confirmation times which have plagued the network since its mass uptake which began around one year ago.

While altcoins such as Bitcoin Cash and most recently Ripple have jumped on the problem as proof their offerings are more valuable than Bitcoin, early adopters remain confident that so-called Layer 2 updates such as LN payments will make such arguments null and void.

Late last month, Bitcoin-based cellphone top-up service Bitrefill also began using Lightning mainnet payments to fulfil customer orders as part of successful “limited testing”.

What do you think about the launch of mainnet Lightning Network payments? Let us know in the comments below!


Images courtesy of Twitter, Shutterstock

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Srp 25

Segwit Activated: How it Works & What’s Next for Bitcoin

· August 25, 2017 · 4:00 am

Segregated Witness, or Segwit, has finally been activated by a super majority of the current hashpower on the Bitcoin network. Segwit fixes many bugs currently in the protocol, and allows for some scaling using an effective blocksize increase.


Almost two years of debate

In December of 2015, the source code for Segregated Witness (Segwit) was released. It was meant as a fix for the ever-problematic transaction malleability bug, which allowed for someone to change one or two characters of a transaction’s ID before it was cemented into the blockchain. Along with that, it provided a method of scaling Bitcoin. Doing away with the concept of a blocksize, a new metric was made called blockweight.

For years the software was not added to the Bitcoin protocol as it never garnered the necessary 95% of the hashpower needed to activate. It was to be implemented though means of a softfork, which meant it would comply with all currently consensus rules and be backwards compatible with those running old software and did not wish to upgrade.

Whether you believe that Segwit was a direct result of the grassroot approach of BIP148 forced miners to finally activate it after all this time, or the New York Agreement was the reason everyone came together to signal for Segwit, it is finally here.

A second BIP was released weeks ago to lower the activation threshold to 80% of the hashpower, but even with the lowered bar Segwit still achieved around 97% signaling and locked in during the beginning of August.

After the official lock-in period, the network allowed for two weeks to provide grade period of sorts for people to upgrade their software to work with Segwit.

How Segwit Works

There has been a ton of misinformation about Segwit, so this article will hopefully clear some things up of how it actually works. As stated earlier the whole idea of a blocksize has been gotten rid of. Instead, the network will now use blockweight.

There’s two types of data that are contained in a transaction. Firstly, there is actual transaction data, such as the address the coins are being sent to. Then there is the witness data, which is all the information that is only needed when the transaction is confirmed, and then that data is essentially never used again.

Segwit provides a “discount” to the witness data, and once committed to the blockchain it gets pruned. These 1000 1KB transactions would obviously fill the current blocksize of 1MB, but remember blocksize isn’t even a metric any more. It’s been replaced by blockweight, the new limit of which will be set at 4,000,000 “units.”

The way the new unit system works is the number of units in a transaction is simply the number of bytes of transaction data multiplied by four. Witness data is, as said before, discounted. The bytes of the witness data are essentially a direct translation to units at a 1:1 rate.

So, for example, let’s say there’s 1000 transactions in the mempool, all at 1KB of data. Now let’s say in each of the transactions, 400 bytes is witness data and the other 600 bytes is transaction data. The 600 bytes for transaction data is now worth 2,400 units, while the witness data is now worth 400 units giving the whole transaction a weight of 2,800 units. All of these transactions together will only take up 2,800,000 of the 4,000,000 units, leaving room for more transactions.

Once the transaction is confirmed by the network, the not needed witness data will be pruned off the blockchain, to save storage space and decrease bandwidth use.

How Do I Actually Use SegWit?

For those of you expecting an immediate sign that Segwit is helping everything, I’m sorry to let you down. In reality, it could be weeks or even months before Segwit really starts to have widespread adoption.

Segwit transactions can only be sent from Segwit addresses. So, every single address that currently contains coins would have to send them to a Segwit address before we see the full effect of the upgrade. And even then, there could be a decent chunk of users who still don’t trust Segwit and don’t want to use it. Which is perfectly fine, that’s the point of a softfork. It doesn’t force users who don’t agree to it to upgrade to it.

For you to use segwit and send segwit transactions, you’ll need to send your coins to wallet that generates Segwit addresses. Otherwise, it will just be a normal transaction.

Moving forward, Segwit was an important setup to the upgrading and scaling of the Bitcoin network, which has been woefully overloaded in the past several months. Segwit opens the door to better implementation of the lightning network, which can allow for transactions to be sent off chain for pennies.

Coming in November, the second half of the New York Agreement is set to take place calling for a doubling of the blockweight to even further scale the network though means of a hardfork.

Will you be using segwit from here on in? How do you think this will effect the network? Let us know in the comments below!


Images courtesy of Shutterstock, Segwit.co

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Kvě 10

Litecoin Activates SegWit Today As Price Nears $40

· May 10, 2017 · 9:48 am

SegWit activation day is here for Litecoin as the fourth-largest cryptocurrency gains another 38% in price.

Litecoin Passes $35, Lee Remains Cool

With just several hours to go before its “locked-in” status changes to “activated”, investors are celebrating as Litecoin’s price per token exceeds $35.

The surge marks a turnaround in the altcoin’s fortunes, prices having suffered earlier this week as assets across the board hemorrhaged value.

Poloniex, a major altcoin exchange, experienced slowness and loading problems, which some pointed to as a major cause of panic selling resulting in a broad comedown.

On Twitter Wednesday, Litecoin creator Charlie Lee appeared naturally upbeat, noting nonetheless that this was just the start for his cryptocurrency.

SegWit Still King For Investor Confidence

The rags-to-riches story has been marked by overwhelming investor appetite for SegWit. The confidence that accompanied Litecoin locking in the technology appeared to engulf any misgivings or even alleged attempts to derail the process.

This in turn led to a rapid U-turn for two other altcoins, namely SysCoin and Vertcoin, which both successfully activated SegWit and benefitted from giant price rises.

As in the case of Litecoin, criticism that SegWit activation was simply a tool for developers to make money did not stop trading interest.

Now, Litecoin will no doubt be eyeing the next step in the chain – introduction of Lightning Network transactions.

Lightning Network Brewing

“The activation of segwit on Litecoin allows us to deploy Lightning on an active production blockchain,” Lightning’s Olaoluwa Osuntokun wrote in a blog post last week.

“With our ultimate launch, we’ll be able to examine monetary incentives within the network, observe the emergent properties of the networks’ channel graph, and see the rise of production services and applications built on top of the network.”

A survey conducted by Lee meanwhile suggested Litecoin users were keener on harboring their funds long term than testing Lightning.

Lee himself stated that he intended to both “hodl” and test the technology.

Across the altcoin board meanwhile, only a modest recovery is noticeable, while Bitcoin is also down from its near $1800 highs. The figures will likely be music to the ears of experts such as Vinny Lingham, who repeated warnings about “bubbles” in recent public comments.

What do you think about Litecoin after SegWit activation? Let us know in the comments below!


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Srp 13

Blockstream Welcomes New Members to Their Team, Hires On Christian Decker

Source: bitcoin

Blockstream Welcomes New Members to Their Team, Hires On Christian Decker

Prominent Bitcoin enthusiast and proposer of ‘duplex micropayment channels,’ Christian Decker, announced on Twitter today that he will be joining the Blockstream team to work on L2 protocols.

Decker Joins Blockstream to Work on Lightning Network

According to Blockstream’s official blog, Decker was hired on to bring his expertise and talent to the company’s current research on lightning networks. While pursuing this line of work he will be joined by Blockstream developer, Rusty Russell, who has made theoretical contributions to the advancement of lightning networks in the past.

Decker is an early adopter of Bitcoin, as he began engaging in the cryptocurrency while it was still in its infancy in 2009. He has also created a number of protocols including PeerConsensus and Duplex Micropayment Channel. Furthermore, Decker brings with him the unique distinction of having authored the world’s first PhD dissertation about Bitcoin at ETH  Zurich while working with the Distributed Computing Group.

Along with Decker, Blockstream also took the chance to formally welcome other new employees that they have brought on since early this year. A noteworthy hiring has been that of Kat Walsh — joined in February as legal counsel — having served on the board of the Wikimedia Foundation for seven years, including a term as its chair. Additionally, Blockstream also hired on Eric Martindale as “Developer Evangelist.” Eric has a long history with Bitcoin, having worked a similar role for Bitpay.

Ever since the acquisition of the European-based Bitcoin wallet software provider, GreenAddress, it seems Blockstream has been trying to expand its operations. The new batch of hirings, especially that of Christian Decker, only works to further this belief as the company itself looks to continue its efforts in Bitcoin development with projects like the lightning network.

What do you think of Blockstream’s hiring on Christian Decker? Let us know in the comments below!


 

Images courtesy of Blockstream, Christian Decker

 

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Blockstream Welcomes New Members to Their Team, Hires On Christian Decker

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Kvě 16

Everyone’s Favorite Crypto Just Might Scale After All

Source: bitcoin

scale

The popular Bitcoin explorer and wallet company Blockchain.info has revealed a new protocol to the cryptocurrency ecosystem called the Thunder Network. The project is in its alpha release and the code is open source. Thunder allows users to make off-chain payments instantaneously with lower fees.

Also read: Japanese Company Raising Funds Abuses Tech Bureau Corp. Credentials

Can The Thunder Network Help Scale Bitcoin? 

Blockchain.info’s Thunder claims it will be able to process transactions at a rate faster than most credit card processors such as Visa and Mastercard. Currently, many developers and community members are afraid the Bitcoin protocol will not scale to the masses. Proponents of raising the block size or those who wish to use off chain solutions do not believe the network could handle 100 transactions per second. However with the Thunder Network the team claims it will be able to process 100,000 transactions per second. Blockchain.info’s blog states:

“Thunder has the potential to facilitate secure, trustless, and instant payments. It has the ability to unleash the power of microtransactions, to allow the bitcoin network to handle heavy loads, and to increase user privacy.”

There have been a few solutions brought to the table with scaling Bitcoin over time. Some of the ideas include a hard fork to raise the block size to 2mb or above. Then on the other hand off chain solutions such as the Lightning Network, Segregated Witness (SegWit) and Duplex Micropayment Channels (DMC) have been introduced in theory with some testing. Blockchain.info thought it would be best to release the code and alpha now saying, “We believe it is critical to get something in the hands of users as soon as possible to gain feedback that will enable us to be ready when the network is. So review it, test it out, open an issue on GitHub.”

With the popular wallet’s impressive user base the testing may get a lot of traction. Blockchain.info has already done some inside testing of Thunder already and you can view the experiment via the company blog. The platform had sent transactions to the two people in a “trustless manner based on the Lightning Network.” Blockchain.info states in their blog until now ideas like the Lightning Network are “purely conceptual, research-based, and only in test nets and labs – until now.” The two people who tested the Thunder Network were CEO of Blockchain.info Peter Smith and the team’s recently hired engineer Mats Jerratsch.

Blockchain.info wants people to know the project is currently experimental and not quite ready. Thunder is only suitable for testing at the moment and should only be used with trusted parties. The company says, “Try this amongst your dev team or amongst your trusted internet friends, but don’t use it for real payments. Remember: this is alpha testing software.”

The world of Bitcoin-land is getting exciting with new opportunities like these projects. It’s good to see developers taking initiative and coming up with things like Lightning, Thunder, Segwit, and DMC. With quality testing and implementation (and less arguing), everyone’s favorite cryptocurrency just might scale after all!

What do you think about the Thunder Network? Let us know in the comments below.


Images via Pixabay and the BC.info blog 

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Everyone’s Favorite Crypto Just Might Scale After All

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Kvě 10

OpenBazaar’s ‘Ambitious Destination’

Source: bitcoin

OpenBazaar

The OpenBazaar team has released its roadmap to the public via a Medium blog post and a picture of the company Trello board. The decentralized marketplace had “received a better than expected response,” and has gained visitors from all across the globe. With this, the company thought it would let the community know the upcoming development plans for the future.

Also read: BitcoinAverage: Craig Wright Can’t Keep Bitcoin Down For Long

“Today we’re releasing our high-level roadmap for OpenBazaar, — Our mission is to make trade free for everyone, everywhere. Our vision is for OpenBazaar to become Commerce 2.0: a permissionless and censorship-resistant protocol for global trade using Bitcoin.”

OpenBazaar’s 1-2 Year Roadmap

The developers of OpenBazaar say the roadmap goals are an “ambitious destination” that will likely take 1-2 years. The team tells the community the project is fully open source and users are invited to join the Slack group to help contribute. Additionally, they write the roadmap is called “high level” and some expansions include “important platforms such as mobile.” The outline detailed in the OpenBazaar blog says there constant ongoing commitments of which some are short term, medium, and long-term goals.  

Some of the long-term achievements the team wants to tackle are improving the moderation system, reputation enhancement, listing flexibility, discovery search, and more privacy. The OpenBazaar developers intend to enable Tor and other privacy-centric features after additional development is added. OpenBazaar states, “Going forward, we will be upgrading the network backend to IPFS, which is discussed in greater detail below. This upgrade will be a significant step forward to eventually integrating Tor.” Short term deployments for the decentralized marketplace include:

  • Email notifications
  • Webhooks
  • Backups
  • Order management
  • Inventory management
  • Order process UI
  • Sales control center improvements
  • Advanced digital goods
  • Blockchain ID on-boarding

Some medium-term goals include “big ticket” items such as an Interplanetary File System (IPFS). The protocol is a hypermedia for building distributed file systems, and would be an extension to the OpenBazaar network architecture. This feature would act like BitTorrent says OpenBazaar and the developers say, “when you visit another user’s store, your node will download and begin seeding that store data to other users.” The new framework will benefit users a great deal with enhanced censorship resistance, persistent content, multi-transport, local connections, and improved DHT implementation.

Additionally, OpenBazaar developers want to add advanced messaging that are encrypted and sent in real-time. The team also wants to add a full featured Bitcoin wallet integrated into the platform. OpenBazaar says the goal is to help new Bitcoin users manage the cryptocurrency on the site. The decentralized marketplace blog states:

“OpenBazaar uses a basic BIP32 wallet to manage multisignature escrow transactions in a user-friendly way. Ultimately, we want to include a full featured wallet in the application. The goal here is to make it easier for users to manage their Bitcoin (especially those that are new to Bitcoin) and incur fewer bitcoin transaction fees when transferring funds out of the app.”

Lastly OpenBazaar says it will be fully compatible with off chain proposals such as the Lightning Network and Segregated Witness. The team also details it will be working on a mobile app noting that, “mobile is eating eCommerce like software is eating the world.” They plan to launch a client-only mobile application and hope that it “empowers users” to manage their node.

The decentralized marketplace has a lot of work to accomplish and many community members are supporting its future stake in the new economy. The company got a lot of honourable mentions at the recent CoinDesk Consensus 2016 event and completing a roadmap like this one will bring the team quite a few more.

What do you think about OpenBazaar’s roadmap? Let us know in the comments below.   


Images via OpenBazaar Websites, and its associated blog

 

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OpenBazaar’s ‘Ambitious Destination’

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